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DISCUSSIONS > IIA GENERAL DISCUSSION AREA [ REFRESH ]
Thread Title: Self harm during investigative interview
Created On Thursday August 16, 2012 7:45 AM
  Self harm during investigative interview
  Self harm during investigative interview
  Self harm during investigative interview


MichaelUK


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Joined: Dec 2010

Thursday August 16, 2012 7:45 AM

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Warning, the paragraph below is not for the faint hearted or squeamish; please don’t read if you’re of a sensitive nature. Mods, I’ve tried to keep it as vague as possible, however please edit if you think it too graphic.

My colleagues and I recently encountered a (thankfully) very unusual situation whilst conducting an investigative interview last week. The employee being interviewed admitted to the theft for which he had been suspected, following which we contacted the police. Whilst waiting for the police to arrive the interview was adjourned, during the adjournment the employee was allowed to the mens room (accompanied to the door of, but not in to, as there was only one way in/out), and on his return it became obvious that he’d been self harming with a blade. The police arrived at this time, they took over the first aid and the employee was taken from the scene in an ambulance.

My main query is surrounding the weapon, as although this was an investigative interview, it could easily have been any other form of interview. I'm just brain storming now, but prior to interviews should we be asking staff to turn out their pockets? or performing a frisk (!)? Should we be asking them about their mental health and history of carrying concealed weapons?

I'm particularly interested in responses from the USA, as gun/knife laws are less strict there than here in the UK, which leads me to assume that it may be more of an issue in the USA than in the UK (I've posted on the IIA UK forum, however nobody has ever experienced anything similar).

I welcome the thoughts of everybody. Thanks.

Michael

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lvcynic


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Thursday August 16, 2012 11:07 AM

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Michael, you used the word, "interview" on a couple of occasions so I would not ask an interviewee to turn out their pockets or ask someone to frisk them. If this was an interrogation then I would do so. However, as an auditor, I would not want to conduct an interrogation. Instead, I would want Security, law enforcement, or someone more versed in interrogation techniques to lead such an endeavor.

What an awful situation for you to have been involved with; hopefully that will be the last such time you have to deal with something even remotely close to physical harm.

Chris

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controlpatrol


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Tuesday August 21, 2012 2:12 PM

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The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners provides some guidance on what you should or should not do in an interview situation. In the US, you must be careful with issues such as unlawful restraint or search and seizure. These are particularly important if you are a representative of a governmental entity.

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DISCUSSIONS > IIA GENERAL DISCUSSION AREA [ REFRESH ]
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