First Quarter 2012

Research Foundation Report - Winter 2012

 
 
 
 
2012 Research RFPs Released - New Year Presents Opportunity for Gaining New Perspective
Internal auditing is constantly evolving, bringing new challenges as well as established issues requiring examination from a new perspective. To support practitioners, The IIA Research Foundation (IIARF) has established 2012 priority research topics and invites researchers to submit proposals. Read more.
 
 
New Report Says Stakeholders Want (and Expect) Insight. Are You Delivering?
Success hinges on the ability to deliver value, but what does that mean to an internal auditor? To help achieve its strategic plan for internal auditing to be universally recognized as a profession, The IIA developed a succinct value proposition that internal audit practitioners can use to help advocate for their important roles in organizations around the world. It boiled down to this: Internal audit’s value lies in its ability to objectively deliver assurance and insight. Read more.
 
 
Wayne Moore, CIA — Dedication Defined
Life rarely unfolds as we expect, but sometimes its surprises are the best part. This is a perspective that The Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation (IIARF) Board of Trustees member Wayne Moore, CIA, can relate to. After starting his career as an auditor with a “Big Eight” accounting firm, Moore accepted an offer from a client to work as an internal auditor — a decision he says changed his life. “I never thought I would fall in love with internal auditing and spend the rest of my career there,” Moore says. “But that is exactly what happened.” Read More.
 
 
 
Oh, What a Difference 1,824 Days Make!
The IIA Research Foundation (IIARF) came to life in 1976. Its first three decades of existence offer too many milestones to mention, but some notable highlights include the Systems Auditability and Control (SAC) study, the Competency Framework for Internal Auditing (CFIA), and the Common Body of Knowledge (CBOK) study. Research opportunities also were expanded through the creation of vehicles such as theEndorsed Internal Audit Program (now known as the Internal Audit Education Partnership (IAEP) program), the Esther R. Sawyer Scholarship, and the William G. Bishop III, CIA, Memorial Fund. As we reflected on The IIARF’s accomplishments during its 30th anniversary, we were determined not to rest on our laurels. However, we could not have imagined how much further we would have come just 1,824 days later. Read More.
 
 
 
100%. It’s Not a Number. It’s a Statement. Make Yours.
As the most comprehensive source of independent research for the internal audit profession, The Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation (IIARF) is relied on by practitioners every day to help them meet the demands of stakeholders. You have probably accessed an IIARF product yourself in recent months, but do you know how it came to be? IIARF research is made possible solely through the support of donors. It usually surprises IIA members to learn that 100% of the funding for research comes from donors, not from member dues. Read More.
 
 
 
New Information, New Navigation, and New Delivery Platforms Coming in the New Year for Internal Auditing’s Premier Reference Book
“Larry Sawyer was a prophet and a futurist who could foresee and predict what others could not,” says David McCabe, CIA, CGAP, MPA, a member of The IIA Research Foundation’s (IIARF’s) Committee of Research and Education Advisors. “His writings were a key factor for me, and many others, in choosing a rewarding and meaningful career.” Read more.
 
 
Where Hospitality and Generosity Meet
When venturing into Atlanta, Ga., you can count on a few things: 1) You cannot drive more than a few blocks without landing on a street with “Peach” in the name; 2) There will be no shortage of friendly faces to direct you through the maze of "Peach” streets; and 3) Southern hospitality translates to ongoing generosity . . . at least when you are talking about The Institute of Internal Auditors’ (IIA’s) Atlanta Chapter. Read more.
 
 
 
Why I'm Passionate About Research
People have a fundamental need to seek answers to questions. My passion for research stems from basic intellectual curiosity. Research is never- ending. It is an ongoing process of seeking answers to questions, solutions to problems, and new ideas and better ways of doing things. Just as a good internal auditor continues to ask “Why?” in order to understand the root cause of an issue and recommend a feasible solution, research poses a question and then collects and analyzes data to answer that question. Research is the essence of internal auditing — always searching for a better, more efficient, or more effective way to achieve goals. Read more.
 



All contents of this Web site, except where expressly stated, are the copyrighted property of the Institute of Internal Auditors Inc.

2012 Research RFPs Released

New Year Presents Opportunity for Gaining New Perspectives
Internal auditing is constantly evolving, bringing with it new challenges as well as established issues requiring examination from a new perspective. To support practitioners, The IIA Research Foundation (IIARF) has established 2012 priority research topics and invites researchers to submit proposals on:
Additionally, The IIARF is leveraging the power of the 2010 Common Body of Knowledge (CBOK) by simultaneously releasing four CBOK related RFPs:
Review Proposal Guidelines and submit your proposal by March 12, 2012.
To submit your proposal and for more information, please contact IIARF at +1-407-937-1356 or research@theiia.org
 

 



All contents of this Web site, except where expressly stated, are the copyrighted property of the Institute of Internal Auditors Inc.

New Report Says Stakeholders Want (and Expect) Insight. Are You Delivering?

Success hinges on the ability to deliver value, but what does that mean to an internal auditor? To help achieve its strategic plan for internal auditing to be universally recognized as a profession, The IIA developed a succinct value proposition that internal audit practitioners can use to help advocate for their important roles in organizations around the world. It boiled down to this: Internal audit’s value lies in its ability to objectively deliver assurance and insight.
Through the International Professional Practices Framework (IPPF) and other resources, The IIA provides extensive guidance and information regarding internal auditors’ roles in assurance and how to remain objective when conducting their work. However, there’s still ample opportunity for the profession to better understand how it can deliver enhanced insight into their organizations’ strategic risks and opportunities. In April 2011, The IIA Research Foundation (IIARF) launched a study to shed light on the subject, resulting in The IIARF’s recently released report Insight: Delivering Value to Stakeholders.
“The Insight project is one that helps internal audit meet the needs of its most important stakeholders...board members, audit committee members, and senior management,” says IIARF Vice President Margie Bastolla, CIA. To fund this important research project, The IIARF reached out to IIA–New York last spring for support and the chapter came through by donating $35,000 toward the effort. The other half of the project was funded by a $35,000 in-kind donation by Deloitte & Touche, and the final report was completed within eight months.
To arm chief audit executives (CAEs) with practical and actionable information around insight, authors Patricia Miller, CIA, and Tara Smith, CIA, of Deloitte & Touche explored the subject from multiple angles. They completed an Internet survey of related literature and research, issued a broad survey to CAEs and stakeholders in several countries, and conducted in-depth, follow-up interviews based on survey responses. With 358 survey participants that included CAEs, board members, and senior management in 39 countries, the report provides a global snapshot of:
·         Stakeholders’ views on whether internal audit should and is delivering insight, and with what regularity.
·         Key enablers or hindrances to insight delivery.
·         Specific examples and approaches to the delivery of insight.
 
As Wayne Moore, CIA, The IIARF Board of Trustees member who championed the project, points out, “The project confirmed some things that we expected. Almost 90 percent of survey participants agreed with the insight definition, with the same number agreeing that internal audit should provide insight as defined. Also expected was that all groups consistently rated internal audit lower in actually delivering insight, at about 71 percent,” says Moore. “However, some results that were a bit of a surprise were that board members graded internal auditors as well or better than internal auditors graded themselves, while executives graded internal audit much lower.”
 
In follow-up interviews, a key theme emerged as to why the gap existed, pointing to internal audit’s lack of general management and operational experience. Respondents indicated this hindered internal audit’s ability to understand its perspective and subsequently deliver meaningful insight. The report does not leave readers merely pondering this barrier. Instead, it provides workable guidance as to how to overcome it, devoting the last chapter to five “next steps” for CAEs to enhance insight delivery.
Patty Miller speaking at The IIA's 2011 GAM Conference.
 
As Miller explains, “We hope CAEs use the information provided to thoughtfully self-assess their functions, consider the applicability of the examples provided by other CAEs, discuss expectations with their stakeholders, and ultimately strive to enhance insight delivery within their organizations.”
She asserts that if there is one takeaway CAEs should glean from the report, it is this: “You have to be a proactive, well-informed, articulate, business and management-knowledgeable, and, sometimes, courageous leader to demonstrate insight delivery to all stakeholders.” She also offers some cautionary words she hopes CAEs will use to fuel their passion for making a meaningful contribution. “We need to remind ourselves and our teams routinely: Our job is to be a positive catalyst to business improvement, not just to test controls. And we need to think about whether our measurements, policies, procedures, or messages reinforce the wrong behavior. If the primary focus is on hitting the budget and not on delivering value, you’ll never get there.”
“Without The IIARF 2010 Common Body of Knowledge study on the global perception of the profession, insight research could not have occurred,” Bastolla explained. “The Foundation continues to look at ways to build upon its research by addressing the needs of the profession. Our goal is to continue to shed light on the research, get beyond the theoretical, and provide practical information — like Insight: Delivering Value to Stakeholders — for internal audit professionals to act upon and use to make an impact in their organizations.”

The complete report can be downloaded by IIA members for free at the IIARF bookstore.



All contents of this Web site, except where expressly stated, are the copyrighted property of the Institute of Internal Auditors Inc.

Wayne Moore, CIA — Dedication Defined

Life rarely unfolds as we expect, but sometimes its surprises are the best part. This is a perspective that The Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation (IIARF) Board of Trustees member Wayne Moore, CIA, can relate to. After starting his career as an auditor with a “Big Eight” accounting firm, he accepted an offer from a client to work as an internal auditor — a decision he says changed his life. “I never thought I would fall in love with internal auditing and spend the rest of my career there,” says Moore. “But that is exactly what happened.”
When Moore joined The IIA in 1979, he was in the infancy of his career and The IIARF was in the infancy of its development. He has watched the tremendous growth of The IIARF through the eyes of a maturing practitioner. “In the early days, The Foundation focused on developing the basic tools internal auditors needed to do their job in a manual world, focusing extensively on interviewing, sampling, and drawing valid conclusions,” says Moore. “As the world evolved, The Foundation was there to provide what internal auditors needed to know regarding the new specialty of IT auditing.” It was this responsive approach to research that hooked Moore and has kept him engaged ever since.
Moore’s love for the profession made earning promotions and making meaningful contributions to the profession through his IIARF involvement seemingly effortless. During more than 26 years with DuPont, he served as an internal audit supervisor, an audit manager, and, eventually, an audit director. He simultaneously donated his time and expertise to The IIARF, serving as a Board of Trustees’ member and spearheading countless projects. In 2003, he was honored with the Bradford Cadmus Memorial Award for his years of devotion to The IIARF.
He credits The Foundation for helping him navigate his way through the growing number of issues during his career. “I used IIARF products extensively to educate myself and my staff on a plethora of issues.” It is his respect for its work that has kept him actively engaged with The Foundation since retiring from DuPont in 2005. Since then — in addition to consulting and enjoying a few more rounds on the golf course — he has taken charge of The IIARF’s Fundraising Task Force and championed new initiatives like the Research Alliance during his time as vice president of development for The IIARF.
The project, brought to life with former IIARF Vice President Bonnie Ulmer, allows chapters and organizations to take an active role in bringing to fruition research that matters to them. Getting the project off the ground involved networking, an area where Moore’s skills were put to good use. “Wayne never meets a stranger, and he has an exceptional ability to engage people in a way that is highly productive,” says Ulmer. “He’s the definition of a leader in that he motivates people to get behind his vision and make it happen.” IIARF Vice President Margie Bastolla, CIA, echoes Ulmer’s sentiment. “Wayne is an outstanding example of an internal auditor who has dedicated many years to moving this profession forward, whether by his actions as a leader at DuPont or his leadership roles in The Research Foundation. I look forward to working with him for many years to come.”
“I am a true believer that the best way for successful internal auditors to ‘pay back’ the profession is through a contribution to The IIARF.” It is a message that he lives and breathes, as evidenced by the interview he gave for this very profile. Rather than focus on his own accomplishments, Moore’s responses highlighted the achievements of The Foundation and the importance of supporting its work. His words were saturated with sincerity. “I believe The Foundation has a story worth telling,” says Moore. And Mr. Moore, we think there are more than a few people who would agree that you tell it well. For that, we thank you.


All contents of this Web site, except where expressly stated, are the copyrighted property of the Institute of Internal Auditors Inc.

Oh What a Difference 1,824 Days Make!

In 1976, The IIA Research Foundation (IIARF) came to life. Its first three decades of existence offer too many milestones to mention, but some notable highlights include the Systems Auditability and Control (SAC) study, the Competency Framework for Internal Auditing (CFIA), and the Common Body of Knowledge (CBOK) study. Additionally, research opportunities were expanded through the creation of vehicles like the Endorsed Internal Audit Program (now known as the Internal Audit Education Partnership (IAEP) program), the Esther R. Sawyer Scholarship, and the William G. Bishop III, CIA, Memorial Fund. As we reflected on The IIARF’s accomplishments during its 30th anniversary, we were determined not to rest on our laurels. However, we could not have imagined how much further we would have come just 1,824 days later.

We make note of the number of days because we realize that it is the day-in and day-out efforts of those who work for, with, and on behalf of The Foundation that turns breaks the big picture into manageable snapshots that come together to equal progress. As we celebrate 35 years of advancing the profession through research, we would like to thank all of those who have made The Foundation’s goals realities and highlight some of The IIARF’s most recent accomplishments.
In 2007, The IIARF published the first internal audit textbook, a collaboration of three academics and three practitioners. Kurt Reding, CIA; Paul Sobel, CIA; Urton Anderson, CIA, CCSA, CGAP; Michael Head, CIA; Sridhar Ramamoorti, CIA, CFSA, CGAP; and Mark Salamasick, CIA, CISA, CSP, formed the powerhouse team that married academic theory with real-world knowledge. The textbook is used by numerous universities and colleges around the world to educate upcoming internal auditors.  
By 2008, the foundation of the global economy had been shaken and organizations were relying on internal audit more than ever before to provide assurance and restore some sense of stability to a crumbling public confidence. Knowing that meeting the needs of practitioners would require faster access to information, The IIARF initiated an overhaul of its bookstore’s ordering system. In April 2008, the IIARF bookstore realized full e-commerce capabilities. This allowed order forms to be auto-populated, reducing time and eliminating risk of human error, and enabled orders to be processed more efficiently, putting products in practitioner hands sooner. Eliminating the old labor-intensive process provided a better customer experience. Additionally, eliminating the manual processes by the fulfillment house saved manpower, allowing The Foundation to realize substantial cost savings.
In addition to providing customers with a better online experience at The IIARF bookstore website, The Foundation also worked to enhance the onsite bookstore at IIA conferences, seminars, and events. A point-of-sale (POS) system was implemented by The IIARF that made purchasing books while at an event fast and easy. The new system reduced lines at the bookstore and enhanced the level of security with which transactions were processed. As with the implementation of the bookstore’s online e-commerce capabilities, the introduction of the POS system to the onsite bookstore eliminated labor-intensive, manual processes. The savings realized allowed the system to pay for itself in record time.
To keep the bookstore content fresh, The IIARF has explored ways over the last five years to fund research projects through relationship building. The IIARF leadership came together to structure programs that would actively seek out support from chapter and organizations and share The IIARF’s story. The result was the expansion of The IIA’s Principal Partners Program to include support for The IIARF and the introduction of its Research Alliance, an initiative that allows chapters and organizations to support targeted research projects of high interest to their constituencies. In 2011, the expansion of the Principal Partners Program alone generated more than $90,000 in support for research, and through a combination of multi-year commitments and one-time donations, IIA chapters have rallied behind the Research Alliance with more than $250,000 in support.
Finally, we cannot conclude without mentioning the 2010 Common Body of Knowledge (CBOK) study. Released at The IIA’s 2011 International Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, it is the most comprehensive study ever conducted on the profession of internal auditing. It is comprised of two components:The IIA Global Internal Audit Survey, a follow-up to the 2006 survey; and the Stakeholders’ Expectations and Perceptions Survey, launched in the United States only as a pilot survey. With involvement from more than 80 IIA institutes around the world, the Global Internal Audit Survey generated 13,582 responses from practitioners in more than 107 countries and 22 languages.
The growth of the study from 2006 was impressive. In addition to adding the stakeholders’ survey to the 2010 study, The IIARF also developed a feedback intelligence (FI) tool, a searchable database that houses the responses from both the 2006 and 2010 surveys that can be accessed by IIA institutes and researchers for future projects.
“The 2010 CBOK study is a valuable reference tool that documents the evolution of the profession of internal audit worldwide,” says IIARF President Patricia Scipio, CIA. “For the first time, we have concrete input from our constituents and recommended techniques to stay closer to our customers.”
It is hard to believe all of these accomplishments have been realized in just the last five years. When asked what he believes is the secret to The IIARF’s longevity and tremendous success, IIA President Richard Chambers, CIA, offered this: “Over the last 35 years internal auditing has changed dramatically. However, The IIARF has remained consistent in not only its commitment to serving the profession but in its approach. Its research priorities have maintained an exceptional balance between exploring issues that proactively anticipate practitioners’ needs and those that are responsive to what is required in this moment in time — two components necessary to stay relevant. By taking a holistic approach to the needs of the practitioner, and thereby the profession, they have found the keys to success.”
“We are embarking on another exciting year of projects and initiatives in 2012 — offering many more IIARF bookstore educational products in digital formats and exploring topics such as Internal Audit Communication, Responding to Significant Risk Events, Fraud in Emerging Markets and Global Security, Auditing Ethical Behavior, and more,” IIARF Vice President Margie Bastolla, CIA, shared. “I’m so proud to join an organization with a huge legacy committed to advancing the internal audit profession with innovative research, knowledge, and education. It will be an exciting five-year journey leading into our 40th anniversary of The Foundation that we share with our volunteers, donors, sponsors, boards, committees, and staff. ”

 



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100%. It’s Not a Number. It’s a Statement. Make Yours.

As the most comprehensive source of independent research for the internal audit profession, The Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation (IIARF) is relied on by practitioners every day to help them meet the demands of stakeholders. You have probably accessed an IIARF product yourself in recent months, but do you know how it came to be? IIARF research is made possible solely through the support of donors. It usually surprises IIA members to learn that 100 % of the funding for research comes from donors, not from member dues.
To ensure this research continues uninterrupted, in 2011 The IIARF launched the “100%” fundraising campaign to inspire 100% of The IIA’s leaders to donate to The IIARF. “As leaders, we have donated our time and we have shared our knowledge,” says Denny Beran, CIA, CCSA, CRMA, CPA, CFE, chairman of the board for The IIA and chief audit executive of JCPenney Co. and one of the drivers behind The Foundation’s campaign. Beran has worked in collaboration with IIARF President Patricia Scipio, CIA, to rally support for the campaign across all levels of The IIA’s leadership structure. “We wanted to challenge leaders to take their commitment to the next level and give back, in dollars and cents, to an organization that has given so much to all of us over the years.”
Beran acknowledges it is an aggressive goal but one worth striving for, as he maintains that 100% support is not simply a number; it is a statement made by each contribution that emphatically says that the future of the profession matters. “It’s easy to count on someone else to make a donation,” says Beran. “But the reality is that if everyone counted on someone else to make the commitment, we would all suffer a great loss.” He emphasizes that it is neither the size of your donation nor whether you are an IIA leader that matters. What matters is that you donate. “The compounded gains that can be realized if everyone gives just a little are immeasurable.”
The 100% campaign has helped grow support among IIA leaders, and you can join them by making your tax-deductible donation to The IIARF before year-end.
Your support will fuel research in 2012 on effective use of technology, ethical behavior auditing, fraud, internal audit communications, responding to significant risk events, and internal audit and strategic direction. “In 2011 alone, The Foundation has completed 23 research and educational projects,” says IIARF Vice President Margie Bastolla, CIA. “And there are currently 29 projects in progress and 16 proposals in review.” With this many plates in the air, Bastolla is acutely aware of the critical role donor contributions play in The Foundation’s ability to fulfill its mission. “The Foundation is producing more research today than ever before. This has only been possible because of donor support,” says Bastolla. “We know donors have infinite choices when it comes to charitable contributions. However, if this profession is important to you, then the work done by The Foundation is important to you as well.”
Be 100% and donate today. It’s validation of your commitment to the profession — and a great tax-deductible donation.


All contents of this Web site, except where expressly stated, are the copyrighted property of the Institute of Internal Auditors Inc.

New Information, New Navigation, and New Delivery Platforms Coming in the New Year for Internal Auditing’s Premier Reference Book

“Larry Sawyer was a prophet and a futurist who could foresee and predict what others could not,” says David McCabe, CIA, CGAP, MPA, a member of The IIA Research Foundation’s (IIARF’s) Committee of Research and Education Advisors. “His writings were a key factor for me, and many others, in choosing a rewarding and meaningful career.”

Lawrence B. Sawyer was the Brooklyn-born son of Russian immigrants who found his calling in internal auditing. He dedicated his life to sharing the value of the profession through speaking engagements and a host of publications that positioned him as one of the great visionaries of his time. Ten years after his passing, The IIARF is in the process of developing the 6th edition of its flagship publication, Sawyer’s Internal Auditing. The latest edition is on target to be released in the spring of 2012 and contains critical updates surrounding internal audit practices, guidance, and research.
Since the last edition was published in 2005, The IIA has updated the International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing (Standards), new guidance has been issued relating to fraud and IT, and risk and control frameworks have been developed that warrant inclusion. The 6th edition will address all of these changes as well as provide insights from the 2010 Common Body of Knowledge (CBOK) study, the most comprehensive global study ever conducted on the profession of internal auditing. It will contain three core modules, including internal audit basics, reporting and managing relationships, and IT and emerging trends. In addition, a new section focusing on Governance, Risk Management, and Compliance (GRC) will be added.
Jim Key, CIA, project manager for the entire series of updates for Sawyer’s Internal Auditing, 6th edition, says beyond providing new information, this update will offer an enhanced, user-friendly format and style. “The 6th edition will have a concise writing style that reflects current professional language and a consistent voice throughout the document based on technical writing standards and best practices,” says Key. “The materials are cross-referenced with other chapters where appropriate and rich with references, exhibits, and citations. It will also include a bibliography that readers can access without slowing down their unique approach to navigating a document, rather than a directive approach of the reference document.”
Another exciting and unique component of this update is the plan to develop a subscription-based service for the edition after the printed version is complete. The service, which will be available electronically, will also enable subscribers to access updates on research material, emerging best practices, Standards, Practice Guides/Advisories, and more. Although Key says there will be ample shelf life for the printed version, he asserts “practitioners increasingly want to access and navigate reference documents such as Sawyer’s Internal Auditing, 6th edition, via a web-based or cloud-enabled resource.” The development plans also include using the update to create The IIARF’s first true “e-book,” with the files being converted into device-specific formats for electronic consumption. Despite all of the enhancements this latest edition will offer, Key maintains one element will remain unchanged: “This edition leverages the long tradition begun by Sawyer himself to present the practice of internal auditing as a forward-leaning profession that promptly responds to clients’ needs.”
Close friends of Sawyer’s, like Michael Piazza, MA, MBA, CICA, will tell you that he had many gifts: An engaging personality, a vision for the future of the profession, and a belief that everyone’s perspective and experience had value. It is perhaps the latter that make his work resonate so deeply with the internal audit community. “Larry often said, ‘I don't know it all, but if I listen to everyone who contributes, I get closer to knowing enough,’” says Piazza.
As The IIARF’s Board of Trustees champion for the project Jim Latorre, CIA, so eloquently captures it, “The ‘Sawyer Brand’ represents the gold standard of our profession. It not only speaks to having the technical knowledge and insight required of an astute internal auditor but also the state of mind and executive presence so clearly needed in today’s complex business world.”
The desire to produce a publication that would truly make a difference to practitioners motivated Latorre to immerse himself in the project, and he says that the end result will be something every practitioner should have in his or her repertoire.“Sawyer’s Internal Auditing is the internal auditor's equivalent of the Physicians’ Desk Reference,” says Latorre. “It is a quick source of information to put you on the right track toward making informed decisions. There will always be the need to dig deeper into the literature; however, we need a place to start the dialogue and it serves that purpose exceptionally well.”
“Addressing today’s internal audit practitioners’ needs with a more user-friendly format, new research, and emerging skill set requirements, The Foundation could not be more excited about this new edition of Sawyer’s,” IIARF Vice President Margie Bastolla, CIA, shared. “In addition, allowing Sawyer’s to be accessed on the shelf, on an e-book reader, or online communicates how The IIARF is evolving to serve the needs of the internal audit practitioners at all levels of their career.”
 


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Where Hospitality and Generosity Meet

When venturing into Atlanta, Ga., there are a few things you can count on: 1) you cannot drive more than a few blocks without landing on a street containing “peach” in the name, 2) there will be no shortage of friendly faces to direct you through the maze of peach streets, and 3) southern hospitality translates to ongoing generosity . . . at least when you are talking about The Institute of Internal Auditors’ (IIA’s) Atlanta Chapter.
IIA–Atlanta has donated regularly to The Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation (IIARF) since 2004, beginning with its donation to the then newly established William G. Bishop III, CIA, Memorial Fund. Since then, the chapter has made annual contributions in support of research totalling tens of thousands of dollars. It is something IIA–Atlanta Chapter President John Fuchko III, CIA, says plays a key role in helping the chapter achieve its goals of innovation, partnership, and advocacy. “Through supporting research, we support innovation. Additionally, we view our support of The IIARF’s efforts as an opportunity to partner with The IIARF on a more global basis,” says Fuchko. “Finally, The IIARF is the premier organization that supports internal audit research globally. Research is what drives the long-term improvements that will make the internal audit profession competitive and that speaks directly to advocacy.”
Fuchko credits his predecessors and the belief of IIA–Atlanta members in the value of the research The Foundation produces for the chapter’s long-term support. He applauds Bill Mulcahy’s efforts during his time as chapter president and later as chairman of the International Conference Committee, which resulted in a donation being made in honor of the Atlanta International Conference volunteers in 2011. He also notes the stellar example set by those like prior IIARF president and active IIA–Atlanta member Paul Sobel. In addition to being an individual donor to The IIARF and a member of the Fundraising Task Force, in 2009 Sobel donated his author stipend from a book he co-authored, Internal Auditing: Assurance and Consulting Services, 2nd Edition. Then in 2011 he wrote a paper for Oracle America Inc. and requested the organization make a donation to The IIARF in his honor.
Regardless of who receives the credit, one thing is clear: Atlanta’s drive to be a city of the future is supported by its IIA chapter. Evidenced through its long-standing support of The IIARF, IIA–Atlanta has proven it is a chapter that is invested in the future of internal auditing.

 



All contents of this Web site, except where expressly stated, are the copyrighted property of the Institute of Internal Auditors Inc.

Why I'm Passionate About Research

There is a fundamental human need to seek answers to questions. My passion for research stems from basic intellectual curiosity. Research is never ending. It is an ongoing process of seeking answers to questions, solutions to problems, and new ideas and better ways of doing things. Just as a good internal auditor continues to ask why in order to understand the root cause of the issue and recommend a feasible solution, research poses a question and then collects and analyzes data to answer that question. Research is the essence of internal auditing — always searching for a better, more efficient, or more effective way to achieve goals.
As the business world grows more complex, the global economy becomes borderless, and technology drifts up to the clouds, the internal audit profession must transform and adapt. The Institute of Internal Auditors Research Foundation (IIARF) is consistently discovering, interpreting, and developing methods for internal auditors to deepen their understanding of topics and issues and better serve stakeholders’ increasing expectations. While internal auditors are on the front line helping organizations identify risks and implement solid systems of internal controls, research is taking place behind the scenes to help understand, shape, and advance the global profession.
Being committed to research is an investment in your future. While you, today’s auditor, provide your organization with value-added services, researchers are scanning the perimeter, scouting out the terrain, and preparing for tomorrow's success. You are serious about helping your organization meet its business and strategic initiatives, so you should also be serious about keeping abreast of the latest tools and techniques to provide enhanced value through your internal audit activity. This in turn translates to a commitment to supporting comprehensive and structured research projects and initiatives designed to help you increase your knowledge and understanding of the nature and properties of the changing business environment and world around you. Let the researchers gather the data, the information, and the facts. Let us perform the systematic investigations and surveys. Let us identify the significant variables, test the theories, support the hypotheses, analyze the results, and interpret the outcome. In the end, you only need to educate yourself by reading the books and reports, applying the guidance, and implementing practical, well-developed solutions.
An investment in research is an investment in your future. I am passionate about research because I am passionate about my future and the success of my organization. Research would not exist without your financial support. The IIARF is a tax-exempt research and education organization that operates independently of The IIA. No money from your IIA membership dues are allocated to The IIARF, so we rely on your tax-deductible donations to fund internal audit research for the profession and for your future. As 100% of your donation goes directly toward internal audit research and education, it is all about you and your profession!
The IIARF is celebrating 35 years of your success in the internal audit profession. I offer my sincere thanks to the entities and individuals who have financially contributed through the years.
 
Patricia Scipio, CIA
IIARF President


All contents of this Web site, except where expressly stated, are the copyrighted property of the Institute of Internal Auditors Inc.